Occupational therapy helps develop your child’s independence and skills in daily activities

An Occupational Therapist (OT) is a health professional who facilitates people of all ages to be as independent as possible in their daily occupations. The ‘occupations’ of childhood include:

Self Care: eating, dressing, toileting, grooming, sleeping;
Productivity: coloring, cutting, building blocks, participating at preschool;
Leisure: playing, sports, social interaction, relaxing.

OTs use purposeful activity and meaningful occupation as therapeutic tools, striving towards independence and function in daily life. OTs at the CVCDA work with infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their parents or caregivers, as well as other team members, using a family-centered approach.

WHEN DO YOU NEED AN OT?

Children are often referred to occupational therapy when they have:

  • A medical diagnosis concerning the child’s development
  • Feeding/swallowing difficulties
  • Fine motor difficulties such as holding a crayon or handling small things
  • Muscles that seem too weak or too strong
  • Eye hand coordination that seems off
  • Trouble focusing or highly distractible
  • Sensory processing challenges such as:
    • Hyper-sensitivity to movement, touch, light, taste, or noise
    • Constant need for movement or crashing and banging
  • Difficulty getting along with friends
  • Issues with daily living skills: feeding, toileting, dressing, grooming, sleeping

WHO CAN REFER?

If you have concerns or questions about your child’s development, you can refer your child yourself.  Public Health Nurses, Family Physicians, Pediatricians, Daycare Providers and other service providers at the Child Development Association can also refer for you.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER REFERRAL?

  • Your child will be placed on a waitlist
  • You will have an opportunity to attend a consultation meeting with an occupational therapist where you will receive feedback on your child’s communications skills and suggestions if needed
  • An OT will contact you when a spot becomes available, and schedule an assessment
  • During your initial therapy visit the OT will work with you to identify area(s) of concern that are interfering with your child’s development by asking you questions and conducting formal and informal assessments with your child

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE ASSESSMENT?

The OT will work with the family and team members to:

  • Develop goals and a program suited to your child’s individual needs
  • Provide therapy or consultation as needed
  • Provide service in the environment best suited to your child’s specific needs (home, Children’s Therapy Centre, and/or childcare centre)

The goal of OT is to facilitate independence and function in daily activities.

HOW CAN I HELP MY CHILD AT HOME?

Resource links we can recommend:

Occupational Therapy:

www.caot.ca

www.cotbc.org

www.therapyfunzone.net

www.mykidsot.ca

www.yogapeutics.com/blog

Sensory Processing:

www.spdfoundation.net

Feeding and Eating:

www.yourkidstable.com

www.feedingmatters.org

Fine Motor Skills:

www.hwtears.com

www.therapystreetforkids.com

Infant and Child Development:

www.caringforkids.cps.ca

www.myintegrationstation.com/developmental-milestones

www.canchild.ca

https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/diagnosis/screen-your-child

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/index.html

Carlin Lindsay

Carlin Lindsay

Occupational Therapist

Phone: 250-338-4288 ext 234
Email: carlin@cvcda.ca

Kylee Abrahamson

Kylee Abrahamson

Occupational Therapist - On leave

Phone: (250) 338-4288 ext 231
Email: kylee@cvcda.ca

Jenn Coombs

Jenn Coombs

Occupational Therapist

Phone: 250-338-4288 ext 245
Email: Li@cvcda.ca

 

Laura McCaffrey

Laura McCaffrey

Supported Child Development Consultant

Phone: ext 287
Email:
laura@cvcda.ca